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15 Aug 2017
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By Maslow
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Blog

Our Take: In-House Video Production Studios or Outsourced Talent?

Video is taking over.

Social media is leading the charge, with the American Marketing Association estimating that more than 85 percent of search traffic will be video-centric by 2019. For companies, businesses, and nonprofit organizations, video’s influence on a customer-base cannot be ignored. It’s no longer a question of if you need a promotional video, but how it will be produced.

Creating and staffing an in-house video production studio can offer companies unique benefits that include an intrinsic depth of knowledge about the subject – them – in addition to brand consistency and complete creative control.

But consider this: What good is control, if the end result causes your brand to veer off course, anyway?

The decision to build an in-house studio or outsource video production often comes down to your company’s needs. Are you looking for a quirky YouTube clip that you can share in the monthly newsletter, or a polished promotional product that you could air on television or the silver screen?

Hiring and training an in-house crew can be a time-consuming and pricey prospect. Video is a field that requires a keen eye, a sharp mind, and a measured dose of creativity and ingenuity. While the logistics and basics of video production can be taught, and even absorbed, in a reasonable amount of time by a layman – the artistry behind the process is something that can, and should, take years to perfect.

Creating quality video requires far more than just an in-house video production studio, a willing staff, and an editing suite. Hiring one in-house professional is costly, let alone an entire crew. Meanwhile, delegating cinematography duties to individuals already on your clock whose true obligations and talents lie elsewhere is a recipe for mediocrity. It can drain your resources and can negatively impact your bottom line.

Speaking of the bottom line, here it is: An amateurish video can reflect poorly on your company and its services. Outsourcing your video production needs yields the following benefits:

  • Subcontracted professional crews have a breadth of experience that can only be derived by a combination of training and passion. They have been at this for years.
  • Outsourced crews have round-the-clock access to state-of-the-art, fastidiously maintained equipment, including cameras, lighting, mics, recorders, and much more – in addition to established connections with rental companies for extraneous needs.
  • Contracts are open-ended. If a job does not work out, or personalities do not mesh – you move on. There are no long term commitments, and no ugliness surrounding firing a videographer you brought onboard a month ago.
  • Outsourcing often results in an influx of creativity that will make your project shine. Occasionally a client can be too close to the subject – their company. Outsourcing offers a fresh perspective.

Admittedly, hiring an outsourced video production company does come with its set of time constraints and considerations. Because firms often need to field the needs of multiple clients at the same time, a common fear is that your video project will take a back seat or experience setbacks. Seek out a company that is interested in a long-term relationship, instead of one-off jobs.

While an outsourced company may not be versed in your company’s history, a quality firm will engage in an in-depth consultation before they even power up the camera.

As a comprehensive video production services company, Maslow Media Group offers end-to-end solutions for any project, any format, and any audience– from news broadcasts to training videos. We can fill positions from the director to the DP, and consult with our clients throughout all stages of production, from concept to completion.

To find out more about why our mantra is “script to screen and everything in between,” request a quote today.

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Written by Maslow